Tuesday, February 10, 2009

Job Satisfaction And The Large Paycheck

This article caught my eye this week:

So much for the notion that workers prize career growth more than cold, hard cash. Half of new college graduates say they would rather have high-paying jobs, even if it means less satisfying careers, according to an Experience Inc. survey. More than one quarter cite student loans as a big factor. (Workforce Management 12.23.08)

Well this could make for some interesting conversations. "Hey Steve-o. I heard you landed a killer job at Intercorp." "Not really, but the pay is great! I'll survive."

Perhaps we could turn our attention towards another point of focus. Could today's college graduates be seeking high-paying jobs simply because they are looking for high pay? Is the desire to become rich overshadowing all other motivations?

Maybe they think that satisfaction on the job is over-rated. Get the bucks, buy what you want, who cares if you are happy.

But what about those who have chosen not-so-lucrative jobs and careers and yet they find a certain contentment in doing what they do. Most of these jobs/careers have to do with investing into the lives of others. Those who follow this path understand that their satisfaction isn't found in the size of their paycheck, but rather in the size of their hearts.

I would say that doing something that helps others, although it may not be on the high end of the pay scale, can prove to be incredibly satisfying. Sure you may not be able to afford all that you want to buy, live where you want to live, and drive what you want to drive, but you feel good about yourself and hopefully lives are being changed.

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